Hot-rolled sheet pile sections — Heavy-duty wall sections

Combined sheet pile walls consist of bearing piles and intermediate piles, and are used worldwide in heavy coastal engineering projects. Applications in ports include quay walls, moles, dock structures and Ro-Ro facilities. Combined walls are also used in locks, weirs, inland ports, landfills and bridge abutments.

For very heavy-duty marine applications, bearing piles are connected with the interlock section. These box piles combine high section moduli with high wall weights. For medium-duty uses in combined walls, bearing piles and intermediate piles are combined according to structural requirements. As additions to the range, new bearing piles with a higher section modulus and a new intermediate sheet pile with a system width of 675 mm have been developed.

Advantages

– Modular system, which provides options for combined sheet pilingplus optimum adaptation to suit structural and constructional requirements

– Secure, structural connections

– Good driving characteristics thanks to essentially symmetrical arrangement of pile sections

(This article comes from thyssenkrupp Infrastructure editor released)

Method for Hot Rolling Z-Sections Sheet Piles

BACKGROUND ART

Steel sheet piles are long structural sections provided with an interlocking system that allows building continuous retaining walls. The most common sheet pile sections are: Z-sections, U-sections, Ω-sections, flat-web sections and H or double-T sections.

Z-section sheet piles include a first flange, a second flange, which is substantially parallel to the first flange, an inclined web, a first corner joining the web to the first flange, a second corner joining the web to the second flange, wherein each of the corners has an opening angle α greater than 90°, preferably in the range of 110° to 140°. The longitudinal edges of the flanges are generally equipped with coupling means for interlocking purposes. In distinct contrast to other sheet pile sections, Z-section sheet piles do not have a plane of symmetry.

It is well known in the art to produce Z-section sheet piles by a hot rolling process, starting from slabs or, more recently, from beam blanks.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,671,630 discloses a method for rolling such Z-section sheet piles from a beam blank. According to this method, a preform of the sheet pile is rolled with curved preforms of the web and the flanges. The curved preform of the web comprises: two web/flange transition sections, which are substantially flat sections parallel to the rolling plane; a middle section, which is a substantially flat section defining an angle of about 60° with the rolling plane; and two connecting bows, connecting the web/flange transition sections to the oblique middle section. The substantially “J”-shaped preforms of the flanges allow rolling the coupling means close to the neutral rolling plane. In a last rolling step, the curved preforms of the web and the flanges are straightened to form the finished Z-section sheet pile.

It is well known in the art that grooved rolls used for rolling Z-section sheet-piles have a relatively short lifetime. Due to the absence of mirror symmetry in their section, one has to produce one side of the Z-section sheet pile in a deep groove of the upper roll and the other side in a deep groove of the lower roll. Such extreme roll gap contours result in that the roll surfaces are rapidly worn out and in that possibilities for their reworking are rather limited. They also increase the risk of a roll fracture.

There is consequently a need for a method for rolling a Z-section sheet pile in which the rolls have a longer lifetime and are less exposed to a roll fracture.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

The invention proposes a method for hot rolling a Z-section sheet pile having a first flange, a second flange, which is substantially parallel to the first flange, an inclined web, a first corner joining the web to the first flange, a second corner joining the web to the second flange, wherein each of the corners has an opening angle α greater than 90°, preferably in the range of 110° to 140°. The proposed method comprises the steps of: (1) rolling a curved preform of the web in successive roll gaps defined by at least one roll pair comprising a grooved upper roll and a grooved lower roll, wherein a preform of the first corner and an adjoining first part of the curved preform of the web are formed in a first groove of the upper roll, in which the latter has e.g. its minimum diameter, and a preform of the second corner and an adjoining second part of the curved preform of the web are formed in a first groove of the lower roll, in which the latter has e.g. its minimum diameter; and (2) subsequently straightening the curved preform of the web between an upper straightening roll and a lower straightening roll. In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, at least in the last roll gaps rolling the curved preform of the web, the diameter of the lower roll decreases in a discontinuous manner in the interval between the first groove in the upper roll and the first groove in the lower roll, and the diameter of the upper roll increases in a complementary manner. Decreasing in a discontinuous manner means that the diameter of the lower roll does not continuously decrease; i.e. there are intermediate portions of the lower roll in the concerned interval, in which the initially decreasing diameter stays substantially constant, and/or in which it increases before it decreases again. In other words, in the interval between the first groove in the upper roll and the first groove in the lower roll, the diameter of the lower roll decreases e.g. in a stepped manner and/or in an undulated manner. It follows that less vertical space is required for rolling the preform of the web; i.e. the minimum diameters of the two rolls may be bigger than with any prior art method of rolling Z-shaped sheet-piles. Consequently, the roll gap contour can be reworked more often, before the minimum diameters of the rolls decrease beyond a limit value. Furthermore, less deep grooves in the rolls also result in smaller rolling torques and in more equal surface speeds along the roll gap contour, i.e. in less mechanical wear of the surfaces of the rolls. In summary, with the proposed method, the rolls wear out less faster and must be reworked less often, but—due to a bigger minimum diameter—can even be reworked more often than with any prior art method for rolling Z-section sheet piles. Last but not least, less deep grooves in the rolls also substantially reduce the risk of a roll fracture. Consequently, with the proposed method, expected total life-time of the rolls can be substantially increased. Finally, it will further be appreciated that the proposed method allows using a relatively thin slab as a starting product for rolling a Z-section sheet pile.

In a preferred embodiment, the diameter of the lower roll decreases, in the interval between the first groove in the upper roll and the first groove in the lower roll, in a an undulated manner, so as to have in this interval at least one intermediate maximum value and one intermediate minimum value. This means e.g. that a third part of the curved preform of the web, which is located between the first part and the second part, is formed partly in a second groove of the lower roll, and partly in a second groove of the upper roll. Due to the fact that rolling of the curved preform of the web is allotted onto at least two grooves in the upper roll and at least two grooves in the lower roll, these grooves may be less deep, i.e. the minimum diameters of the two rolls may be bigger.

In a further embodiment, in the interval between the first groove in the upper roll and the first groove in the lower roll, the diameter of the lower roll decreases then stays constant, before further decreasing. This means e.g. that a third part of the curved preform of the web, which is located between the first part and the second part, is formed between substantially cylindrical portions of the upper roll and the lower roll. Due to the fact that the middle section of the curved preform of the web is rolled—at least partly—between substantially cylindrical roll sections, less vertical space is required for rolling the preform of the web; i.e. the minimum diameters of the two rolls may be bigger than with any prior art method of rolling Z-shaped sheet-piles.

If the centre line of a roll is defined as being the axis (line) about which the roll rotates (i.e. the line passing through the centres of the two bearing journals of the roll) and the nominal diameter of a roll in a roll pair is defined as being the minimum vertical distance between the centre lines of the rolls of the roll pair, the minimum diameter of the lower roll in its—aforementioned—second groove is preferably smaller than the nominal diameter of the lower roll and preferably bigger than the minimum diameter of the lower roll in its first groove; and/or the minimum diameter of the upper roll in its—aforementioned—second groove is preferably smaller than the nominal diameter of the upper roll and preferably bigger than the minimum diameter of the upper roll in its first groove.

(This article comes from FreePatentsOnline.com editor released)

Hot rolled – U (Foundation Products)

Sheet Piles are a high strength interlocking sheeting system and are available in a variety of profiles and lengths.

Hot rolled sheet pile are used in construction in both temporary and permanent works. They are easy to install, low cost and reduce construction time.

Hot rolled sheet piles are available in steel gradesS270GP, S355GPS390GP and S430GP (according to European standards EN 10248), + Jis 5571 SY 295 and SY 390

All steel sheet piles can be supplied with handling holes (dia 50 mm, 200 mm from top), as double sheet piles and with corrosion protection. Special piles, corner sections and a wide range of tie bars and anchors are available on request.

sheet piles

(This article comes from UNISTEEL-INTERNATIONAL editor released)

Hot Rolled Sheet Pile and Its Advantages

Whether to use hot rolled sheet pile or cold formed sheet pile is a question a lot of people face when working with products in the steel industry. However, to know which is right for a project it is best to first know what each are and the differences between the two. The topic of this article will focus on hot rolled sheet pile, what it is used for and the benefits of choosing sheet pile produced with this method.

What is Hot Rolled Sheet Pile?

Hot rolled steel is manufactured through a milling process that involves the steel being rolled at extremely high temperatures to be shaped into its final product – often sheet pile. Steel is rolled at a temperature above its recrystallization temperature, which is over 1700° F. Heating the steel to such a high temperature allows it to be easily shaped and formed into sheet pile. Once the steel cools from the heat, the size decreases slightly so the final size of the product must be estimated. Hot rolled is the desired method for producing sheet metal when the tolerances and the surface quality are not a main factor.

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Applications:

Hot rolled steel can be used in a variety of applications throughout almost every industry in the world. This process is most often utilized to make steel products that are larger in size. It is also ideally used to manufacture structural components and to make sheet pile. It is commonly found in applications for the transportation, construction and railroad industries.

Advantages:

Cost – In most cases, sheet pile that has been cold formed is two times more expensive that hot rolled sheet pile. The difference in price is a result of cold formed steel being a more involved metal-working process.

Malleability – Sheet pile that has been hot rolled is much more malleable than cold formed sheet pile. This allows the product to be more easily forced into the desired shape.

Versatility –Cold rolled steel has little versatility as to what it can be shaped into. Hot rolled steel can be created into a variety of shapes to fit nearly any desired application.

(This article comes from jaydfields editor released)

Features of Steel Sheet Pile Construction Method

As a green-infrastructure reusable material, U-shaped hot rolled sheet pile has meeting the engineering requirements, functional, reliable, ease of use, safety, environmental protection, and other unique advantages with its efficient, durable, simple, lightweight and excellent sectional structure impervious seal shape.

Steel sheet pile with anchor (or support), and other devices constitute integral steel structure, through the pile of larson lock mouth bite each other. Compared with other methods, the steel sheet pile construction has the following distinctive features:

  • The construction is simple, occupied area is small, the construction operation is flexible and simple.
  • Quick operation, short construction period, suitable for the implementation of floods, landslides, subsidence, quicksand disasters such as fast repair.
  • Light structure. Compared with other structures, it is light structure, strong bearing capacity, monomer good vibration resistance.
  • Lie between water is strong, can make the structure quick check water or lost circulation, prevent infiltration, easy construction.
  • Durability, in a relatively harsh environment in the life of up to 50 years.
  • Construction of environmental protection, soil and concrete consumption greatly reduced, effective protection of land resources.
  • Good repeatability, repeated use of 20 ~ 30 times in temporary engineering.

Hot Rolled Sheet Piles vs Cold Formed

What is the difference between Hot Rolled and Cold Formed Sheet Piles?

The main difference lies in the process of which the piles are being produced. Hot rolled sheet piles are produced directly in hot form from a beam blank into its final shape. Cold Formed Sheet Piles on the other hand uses Hot Rolled Coils to roll them under pressure into its final shape in cold (room temperature) forming state. As hot rolled sheet piles are formed under heat, complex interlock shapes are therefore possible however for Cold Formed Sheet Piles, it will just be a simple hook and grip type interlock. Due to the investment required for Hot Rolled Sheet Piles and its associated machinery, there are few mills in the world who can produce such sections. EN Standard Piles are mostly produced in Europe while JIS standard Hot Rolled Sheet Piles are produced in Asia.

Feedstock of Cold Formed Sheet Piles are Hot Rolled Coils and they are largely available worldwide. Due to this availability, Cold Formed Sheet Piles are normally more readily available in lead time and are produced closer to your project location. Furthermore, the ability to buy different types of width and thickness of coils, gives Cold Formed Sheet Piles the added ability to customize new sections and shape which could be optimized to save on weight.

Are Cold Formed Sheet Piles Equivalent to Hot Rolled?

Essentially, yes they are equivalent in sections. All sheet piles are designed based on their sectional properties such as section modulus, moment of inertia and steel grade. Hence, for the same bending moment capacity of each pile, whether Hot Rolled or Cold Formed, they should perform with the exact same characteristics.

This article comes from Mer Lion Metals editor released